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community based management

Historical and contemporary indigenous marine conservation strategies in the North Pacific

The oceans urgently need strategies to halt and reverse the decline of marine biodiversity worldwide. This paper shares the marine conservation approaches of the Kitasoo/Xai'xais First Nation in British Columbia, Canada, and assesses the Conservation Measures Partnership' conservation actions classification system on these approaches. The results show that the embodiment of conservation of the actions as part of the First Nation's worldview, rather than everyday life actions, is missing from  the classification system of the Conservation Measures Partnership.

Video: A Culture of Conservation - Protecting Fiji's inshore fisheries and reefs

This video tells the story of how the people of Fiji, a country with a great marine biodiversity, joint forces with NGOs and the government to improve the health of their coastal fisheries. Dedicated to their mission to improve livelihoods through smart fisheries strategies, the people of Fiji are working together on a network Locally Managed Marine Areas.This marriage of traditional knowledge and modern scientific tools is a success story.

Gender and marine protected areas: a case study of Danajon Bank, Philippines

Since the relationship between gendered fishing practices and participatory management of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) is not frequently examined, this paper analyses the role of gender in community-based managed MPAs in the Central Philippines. The study shows that MPAs were largely perceived to be a tool for men's fishing, although both women and men practiced fishing.

Developing Marine Protected Area Networks in the Coral Triangle

The Coral Triangle MPA network aims to become a comprehensive, ecologically representative and well-managed system of MPAs. This article describes six case studies from the Coral Triangle region that took different approaches to establish and manage MPAs. By analyzing these different case studies, five aspects that contribute to successful outcomes are determined.

Marine Protected Areas succeed with community support (Video)

This video of RARE shows their MPA strategy in Southeast Asia: "Fisheries collapse is a threat facing most fishing communities in Southeast Asia. Communities can reduce this threat by establishing marine protected areas, portions of the sea where fishing is prohibited, that then improve fish stocks which spill over outside the area. Rare trains and works with local conservation leaders to help engage their communities to reduce threats to their environment.

Dispersal of grouper larvae drives local resource sharing in a coral reef fishery

In many tropical nations, fisheries management requires a community-based approach because small customary marine tenure areas define the spatial scale of management. However, the fate of larvae originating from a community’s tenure is unknown, and thus the degree to which a community can expect their management actions to replenish the fisheries within their tenure is unclear. Furthermore, whether and how much larval dispersal links tenure areas can provide a strong basis for cooperative management.

Larval dispersal from a grouper spawning aggregation and the spatial scale of fisheries replenishment

In many tropical nations, fisheries management requires a community-based approach because small customary marine tenure areas define the spatial scale of management [1]. However, the fate of larvae originating from a community's tenure is unknown, and thus the degree to which a community can expect their management actions to replenish the fisheries within their tenure is unclear [2, 3]. Furthermore, whether and how much larval dispersal links tenure areas can provide a strong basis for cooperative management [4, 5].

Dispersal of grouper larvae drives local resource sharing in a coral reef fishery

In many tropical nations, fisheries management requires a community-based approach because small customary marine tenure areas define the spatial scale of management . However, the fate of larvae originating from a community’s tenure is unknown, and thus the degree to which a community can expect their management actions to replenish the fisheries within their tenure is unclear. Furthermore, whether and how much larval dispersal links tenure areas can provide a strong basis for cooperative management.

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