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economic benefits

Estimating the economic benefits and costs of highly‐protected marine protected areas

Marine protected areas (MPAs) are gaining popularity to conserve marine biodiversity and to ensure a sustainable use of marine resources. This study elaborates on how to evaluate the economic benefits and costs of MPAs while providing examples and reviewing different economic methods. Key challenges, such as comparing non-market and markets benefits and quantifying the value of non-protected areas versus MPAs, are identified.

North Devon: Ecosystem Services

This factsheet, a product of the partnership of WWF UK and Sky Ocean Rescue (UK SEAS Project), provides answers to the question: "What are the key benefits the marine environment provides to people, and what are the risks and opportunities?" related to North Devon, United Kingdom. This communication tool gives a brief explaination of how the concept of Ecosystem Services and how this applies to the situation in North Devon. The UK SEAS Project developed several other reports and communications tools that can be find via the link below. 

Study on the economic benefits of marine protected areas

This report is one of the products of a project reviewing the economic benefits of MPAs, which is initiated by the European Commission and carried out by ICF, IEEP and PML. This study, task five of the larger project, gathered information from ten MPA case studies through qualitative research including stakeholder interviews and field visits. The ten case studies investigated the economic benefits of MPAs to evalaluate findings resulting from the project's previous research tasks and to collect lessons learned based on situations from different MPAs in European waters. 

A General Business Model for Marine Reserves

Marine reserves are an effective tool for protecting biodiversity locally, with potential economic benefits including enhancement of local fisheries, increased tourism, and maintenance of ecosystem services. However, fishing communities often fear short-term income losses associated with closures, and thus may oppose marine reserves. Here we review empirical data and develop bioeconomic models to show that the value of marine reserves (enhanced adjacent fishing + tourism) may often exceed the pre-reserve value, and that economic benefits can offset the costs in as little as five years.

Potential costs and benefits of marine reserves in the high seas

To our knowledge, this paper provides the first global, economically supported assessment of the impact on fisheries of potentially protecting a portion of the high seas in no-take marine protected areas. Such closures are likely to result in relatively little global annual profit loss. For example, closure of 20% of the high seas may lead to the loss of only 1.8% of the current global reported marine fisheries catch, and a decrease in profits to the high seas fleet of about US$270 million per year.

Nature's investment bank: How marine protected areas contribute to poverty reduction - Policy brief

This is a 4-pp policy brief of the Nature's Investments Bank project, for decision-makers.This study was designed to determined whether four marine protected areas have contributed to poverty reduction, and if so, why. The study sites are in Fiji (Navakavu), the the Solomon Islands (Arnavon Islands), Indonesia (Bunaken) and the Philippines (Apo Island). The sites are not a random sample but were deliberately chosen because local experts believe they have contributed to poverty reduction.

Nature's investment bank: How marine protected areas contribute to poverty reduction

The study “Nature’s Investment Bank” was designed to determined whether four marine protected areas have contributed to poverty reduction, and if so, why. The study sites are in Fiji (Navakavu), the the Solomon Islands (Arnavon Islands), Indonesia (Bunaken) and the Philippines (Apo Island). The sites are not a random sample but were deliberately chosen because local experts believe they have contributed to poverty reduction. The objective was to study potentially positive examples to see if there are common factors for success.

A general business model for marine reserves

Marine reserves are an effective tool for protecting biodiversity locally, with potential economic benefits including enhancement of local fisheries, increased tourism, and maintenance of ecosystem services. However, fishing communities often fear short-term income losses associated with closures, and thus may oppose marine reserves. Here we review empirical data and develop bioeconomic models to show that the value of marine reserves (enhanced adjacent fishing + tourism) may often exceed the pre-reserve value, and that economic benefits can offset the costs in as little as five years.